The Giveaway, Part II

Last week, I posted that I will be giving away three signed copies of my book to three lucky readers in the US, Canada, or UK (Scotland, Ireland, and England for those of you geographically challenged).

This is the last chance to make your entries—so visit the last post here to find out what you need to do in order to enter. I’ll announce the chosen three next week!

Psst … Up for a Giveaway?

Okay, so I’ve been teasing people on my Facebook page about a chance to receive a free signed copy of Now Entering Silver Hollow.

But I wanted to think about how to go about this giveaway for readers, and I finally decided how to go about it. I didn’t want to make it boring or just some random thing. I like challenges. Since I’m a fan of RPG and quests, I will send you on a mission, should you very dare to accept it.

So, today, I ask that if you want to be one of the three (yes, three) lucky people* who gets a signed copy of my book, you complete these three simple tasks:

  1. Invite people to like my Facebook page.
  2. Comment on the Facebook posts that I put up promoting this blog entry that you’ve completed the first task. These posts will be put up Thursday, May 18th through Sunday, May 21st. If you comment on more than one post, tell me if you’ve invited more people each time.
  3. Add to the comment what you love about horror and weird fiction. 

That’s all there is to it! I will run this giveaway this week and then next week, I will announce the winners right here on my blog. All entries will be assigned a number, and then they will be chosen at random with a random number generator powered by random.org.

*The giveaway is limited to the US, Canada, and the UK (Scotland, England, Ireland, & Wales).

The Psych Writer on Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Gilderoy Lockhart. Zaphod Beeblebrox. Scarlett O’Hara. What do these three characters have in common?

Well, if you read the title, then you could guess they’re all different portrayals of Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD). Even though I enjoyed reading those books, and find many parts of their characterizations to be spot-on accurate, your job as a writer is not to copy those characters. You need to make your own. Make them human. Because a person has a PD does not make them any less human, but they are extremes of the human condition.

The Psych Writer is here to help you with this. Remember, this is not a substitute for therapeutic advice. If you somehow manage to see yourself in these symptoms and it also somehow bothers you (or, you know, if your loved ones are ready to throw you out of the house because you have these signs and symptoms), then seek the advice of a professional health care provider.

Without further ado, here is the lowdown on NPD.

NPD is part of the Cluster B personality disorders. They used to be in the Axis II, but the DSM no longer uses that multiaxial diagnosis (much to their detriment, if I’m to be blunt). Cluster B is the cluster of dramatic, emotional, and erratic personality disorders. That means it’s in the same group as Borderline, Histrionic, and Antisocial personality disorders. (There are ten total, in three clusters.)

People who fit into Cluster B have difficulties with impulse control and regulating their emotions. Ever seen someone in line at the store who is just outrageously angry because the cashier won’t honor a coupon, and they start threatening to sue the store and the cashier personally, calling the employee every name in the book and demanding to speak to the president of the company? Yeah, like that. That’s a problem with regulating one’s emotions.

In order to receive a diagnosis of NPD, the person must have an enduring and persistent pattern of grandiose behavior and feelings, a continuous desire for admiration, and a lack of empathy for others.

NPD begins in early adulthood and is often lifelong (especially if untreated), and can be observed in a variety of contexts (home, work, school, social gatherings, public areas).

The disorder is only diagnosed if the person exhibits five or more of the following signs/symptoms (again, some have all nine, but this isn’t seen often):

  1. Has an exaggerated sense of self-importance that’s grandiose. In other words, they expect you to recognize them as your superior without proportionate credentials or achievements.
  2. They are preoccupied with fantasies of unlimited success, power, brilliance, beauty, or ideal love. (In some cases, they are so preoccupied with the fantasy that they don’t do the work to make those dreams a reality, such as putting in work for promotions or completing their coursework.
  3. They believe they are special and unique to the point where they can only be understood and appreciated by high-status people or institutions, or they may also believe that they should only associate with the above-mentioned.
  4. They require excessive admiration. (If they aren’t constantly complimented and admired, they often become depressed or use manipulative tactics to gather attention.)
  5. They have an enormous sense of entitlement, unreasonably expecting favorable treatment, or having their expectations met without resistance or delay. Think about the coupon explanation above as an example.
  6. They are interpersonally exploitative. That means they’ll take advantage of others to achieve their own ends.
  7. They lack empathy. They refuse to identify or recognize other people’s feelings or needs.
  8. Envy issues: they think people are envious of them, and/or are often envious of others.
  9. They display  and possess attitudes of arrogance and haughtiness.

Behavioral characteristics include what’s known as “narcissistic rages,” which are hellish for the people who have to endure them. Some threaten suicide, some threaten homicide. Some come close to going through with it, and some complete it. Mostly, though, these rages are part of the loss of emotional regulation and sometimes impulse control. Occasionally, they are done to manipulate the other person into the behavior that the person with NPD wants from them.

Are they like this all the time? Yes. The majority of the time they are like this. That’s what pervasive and consistent mean. Don’t forget that when you’re writing the character!

When you do write a character with NPD, remember, you don’t have to hit all of these points. Not everyone is a textbook case and not everyone has every single symptom (in fact, they rarely do have all of them). Infuse your characters with what makes them uniquely human.

Happy writing.


Anne Hogue-Boucher won’t go into a narcissistic rage if you don’t follow her on Twitter or Facebook, but why risk it? You can also buy her books, and that will enable her to eat a sandwich.

» 9 Famous Authors Who Didn’t Get Published Until Their Fifties (Or Older)

I actually do hear a lot of people complain that they’re too old to begin a writing career. But the fact of the matter is, you’re never too old to do anything career wise unless you’re dead or have developed a form of amnestic disorder/dementia.

Considering I’ve read about and met people in their 50s and 60s going to medical school, sitting down to write every day isn’t a challenge by comparison.

So don’t get discouraged. You have a chance to write and get published. Now, you can even choose to go indie and publish on your own with a platform like Pronoun. There’s really no excuse for not sitting down in front of the keyboard.

Even if you have arthritis, you can use a speech-to-text program to aid you in your endeavors.

Below are nine examples of authors who weren’t published till they hit the big 5-0 or later. Write a lot, improve your craft, and don’t give up.

Source: » 9 Famous Authors Who Didn’t Get Published Until Their Fifties (Or Older)

I’ll be back with The Psych Writer soon, going back to tackling personality disorders and how to write them well.